LaTeX2rtf

LaTeX2RTF

This file documents LaTeX2RTF, a converter that translates LaTeX to RTF.

Copyright 1998-2002 Georg Lehner, updates Copyright 1999-2017 by Wilfried Hennings and Scott Prahl, with contributions by Mikhail Polianski.

Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are preserved on all copies.

Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided also that the sections entitled “Copying” and “GNU General Public License” are included exactly as in the original, and provided that the entire resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission notice identical to this one.

Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions, except that this permission notice may be stated in a translation approved by the Free Software Foundation.


1 Introduction

LaTeX2RTF is a translator program from LaTeX text into “rich text format” files. These files are commonly referred to as RTF files. RTF is a published standard format by Microsoft. This standard can be ambiguous in places and Microsoft ignores parts of the standard it finds inconvenient, but RTF is widely used by many WYSIWIG text editors and is supported by Microsoft Word and most text processors.

LaTeX2RTF translates the text and as much of the formatting information from LaTeX to RTF. Be forewarned that the typeset output is not nearly as good as what you would get from using LaTeX directly. So, why bother translating? Consider,

  1. You use LaTeX and hate everything beginning with MS-... Nevertheless, you have to share your documents with people who don’t even know that there are alternatives to MS-...
  2. You know somebody who frequently sends you very fine LaTeX documents. Unfortunately, you are “on the other side” and need to import her files, steal some part, and then desktop publish it in your fine MS-… environment.
  3. You like LaTeX and BibTeX. You interact with the rest of the world. You know someone that wants to include your writing in a Word document.

There are drawbacks to the conversion process. In fact, don’t expect any LaTeX file to be converted as you would like, don’t expect it to be converted without errors or warnings, and don’t be especially surprised when it doesn’t convert at all. LaTeX2RTF is known to have many bugs and many missing features. Paradoxically, this number seems to grow more and more with each day. However, we can categorically state that there are some special cases in which a LaTeX file will be translated to RTF satisfactorily by LaTeX2RTF—This was sort of disclaimer, ok? OK!

LaTeX is a system for typesetting text and therefore it focuses on the logical structure of a document, whilst RTF is meant to be a transport format for a family of Desktop Publishing Software, dealing mostly with the design of a text.

Although the commands and styles in LaTeX are much more flexible and standardized than in RTF, only a small subset of commands has been implemented to date (see Unimplemented Features).

Some of the capabilities of LaTeX2RTF are restricted in scope or buggy (see Known Bugs).

RTF is a moving target, because Microsoft does not stop inventing new extensions and features; consequently you cannot view newer RTF files with older word processors. The syntax and semantics of RTF are somewhat artistic, i.e., you can generate a syntactically correct RTF file that cannot be displayed by some/most word processors. For more details on RTF the specification consult the links at http://latex2rtf.sf.net/


2 Installation


2.1 General

The documentation of the program is found in the doc/ directory in the file latex2rtf.texi in the GNU TeXInfo format. For your convenience, you can find HTML and PDF versions of the manual there as well.
Note: In this manual, the terms "directory" and "folder" are used interchangeably.


2.2 Obtaining LaTeX2RTF

LaTeX2RTF is available for many Unix Platforms, for the Macintosh, and for MS-DOS, including all versions of MS Windows.

The latest version of LaTeX2RTF is available at SourceForge and — with some delay — on CTAN sites: e.g., http://www.dante.de or http://www.ctan.org.

The DOS package will also run under all MS Windows versions up to Windows 7, except 64bit systems. It requires an i386 processor or better.
It should only be used on older Microsoft systems.
For Win9x, ME, NT, or newer, you should use the win or win-NO-GUI package.

The win-NO-GUI package only runs under Win32 (Win9x, ME, NT, 2000, XP, 2003, Vista, Win7, probably Win8 and Win10). From LaTeX2RTF version 2.0.0 up it also runs on 64bit systems.

The win package is the win-NO-GUI package plus graphical user interface (GUI) shell (l2rshell) and installer.
It only runs under Win NT, 2000, XP, 2003, Vista, Win7 and newer.
From LaTeX2RTF version 2.0.0 up it also runs on 64bit systems.

The win64 package (only LaTeX2RTF version 1.9.19) is the win package but with 32bit versions of the shell utilities so that it also runs on 64bit systems. From LaTeX2RTF version 2.0.0 up, there is no separate win64 package, as the win32 package also runs on 64bit systems.

There are a few people working on LaTeX2RTF, and some more make contributions, coordinated by Wilfried Hennings (texconvfaq “at” gmx.de). See the SourceForge project pages for the latest news.


2.3 UNIX

To install,

  1. Edit MAKEFILE for your local configuration. In particular, pay attention to the DESTDIR variable (MAKEFILE line 21). If you do not have root access you might wish to set the makefile variable DESTDIR to be your home directory.

    On some machines the cc compiler will issue errors. Therefore the default compiler command in the Makefile is CC=gcc.

  2. From version 1.9.13 up, LaTeX2RTF supports conversion of LaTeX equations to bitmaps using the shell script latex2png, found in scripts/. latex2png requires that LaTeX, Ghostscript and ImageMagick are installed. LaTeX2RTF will translate documents without a working latex2png, but some features will be missing. You can verify that the latex2png script is working by typing make in the scripts/ directory.
  3. make

    If this is not your first time installation, you may want to preserve your old configuration (*.cfg) files. Copy them to a safe place before installing.

    On IBM AIX, the IBM make utility does not support some of the commands used in Makefile. In this case use gmake (from GNU) instead.

    Sun has decided to support the XPG4 standard on Solaris by an alternative set of binaries. To allow bitmap conversion of equations, two things are needed. First, change the first line of latex2png to #!/usr/xpg4/bin/sh Second, define the XPG4_GREP environment variable accordingly, for bash-like shells XPG4_GREP=/usr/xpg4/bin/grep; export XPG4_GREP or for tsch-like shells setenv XPG4_GREP /usr/xpg4/bin/grep.

  4. make install

    If your mkdir doesn’t support the -p option, then create the necessary directories by hand and remove the option from the $MKDIR variable. If you have other problems, just copy latex2rtf and latex2png to a binary directory, and move the contents of the cfg/ directory to the location specified by $CFG_INSTALL.

  5. make check

    [OPTIONAL] This tests LaTeX2RTF on a variety of LaTeX files. Expect a whole lot of warnings, but no outright errors. (On IBM AIX, use gmake check.) Note that this will check the basic functionality of the latex2png script, and then that of latex2rtf.

  6. make install-info

    [OPTIONAL] This installs .info files for use with the info program.

You no longer need to define the environment variable RTFPATH. This is only necessary if you move the directory containing the .cfg files. Just define RTFPATH to be the path for the new location of the cfg directory.


2.4 plain DOS

The UNIX and Mac packages do not contain an executable for DOS or Windows. You may compile it yourself (with djgpp or MinGW) or get the
DOS package as file latex2rtf-x.x.x_dos.zip (where x.x.x is the version number)
or the win-NO-GUI package as file latex2rtf-x.x.x_win-NO-GUI.zip (no installer, no graphical user interface (GUI))
from SourceForge

The DOS package contains a precompiled executable which should run under plain DOS and also in the command prompt (or “console”) of any MS Windows system including Vista and Windows 7 but not on 64bit systems.

To install the DOS or win-no-GUI package of LaTeX2RTF, extract all files from the zip archive, preserving the folder structure (winzip: check “use folder names”), preferably to C:\l2r, or under Windows, to your "Program Files" folder (which ever it is named in your system) because then it will find its cfg files by default.
If you extracted them to another folder (e.g. C:\my_files\l2r), either edit the file L2RPREP.BAT and change the folder C:\l2r to where you put them, or specify the path to the cfg folder in the command line.
Avoid blanks in folder and file names!

Make sure that the folder containing the file L2RPREP.BAT is in your search path, or put this file into a folder which is in your search path.
To display the current search path, enter PATH from the command prompt (with no arguments).

Under plain DOS, conversion of equations or figures to bitmaps is not possible because Ghostscript and ImageMagick are not available for plain DOS.


2.5 MS Windows systems

To install LaTeX2RTF on a MS Windows system (WinNT, Win2000, WinXP, Vista, Win7), download the win package, execute the latex2rtf-x.x.x_win.exe (where x.x.x is the version number) and follow the instructions.

Note: The installer and GUI shell do not support Win9x and WinMe since LaTeX2RTF v.1.9.17. If you have one of these systems, you should use the win-NO-GUI package (1.9.19 and up) of LaTeX2RTF.

To start the program double-click the LaTeX2RTF icon, or drag and drop a .tex file onto the icon.

If your LaTeX document refers to external graphic files, e.g. eps, or you want to use the option to convert equations to bitmaps, you must have LaTeX, ImageMagick and Ghostscript installed. These programs are freely available for download at http://www.miktex.org/, http://www.imagemagick.org and http://www.ghostscript.com

The following versions were available at the time of writing and tested with LaTeX2RTF version 2.3.11:
- MikTeX 2.9
- Ghostscript 9.19
- ImageMagick-7.0.1-8-Q16-x86-dll.exe

When installing ImageMagick, be sure to choose (check)
"Install legacy utilities (e.g. convert)"

If MikTeX, ImageMagick and Ghostscript are installed, the paths to their executables are detected automatically. If for any reason this doesn’t happen, these paths can be specified manually in the “Environment” tab of the LaTeX2RTF GUI shell window.

If you need to start LaTeX2RTF not from its own shell but from commandline or another Windows application, you need to add the folder containing the latex2png script and the helper programs to the search path.
Some applications (e.g. Lyx) allow to temporarily add the path by specifying it in the options.
If this is not possible, you can add the latex2rtf folder to Windows’ default path like follows:

To add a folder – e.g. C:\Program Files\latex2rtf – to the search path:

If you do NOT use the GUI (l2rshell.exe), either the folders where TeX, ImageMagick and Ghostscript are installed must also be in your search path, or you must edit the file L2RPREP.BAT, ensure that the pathes in this file point to the folders where TeX, ImageMagick and Ghostscript are installed on your machine, and call l2rprep before calling latex2rt.
Or you edit l2r.bat and call l2r instead of calling latex2rt.

If you DO use the GUI (l2rshell.exe), the TeX, ImageMagick and Ghostscript folders are automatically added to the search path by the GUI.

When equations are to be converted to bitmaps, for each equation LaTeX2RTF first writes a temporary l2r_nnnn.tex file to disk which consists of only the equation to be converted. It then sends the call for "bash latex2png l2r_nnnn.tex" to the operating system.
In previous versions of latex2rtf, some users got the message “Out of environment space” (can occur only under Windows 95, Windows 98 or Windows ME); this should be solved now by using bash.exe instead of command.com.


2.6 Macintosh

If you want a MacOS X version, make sure that you have installed the developer tools CD that is appropriate for your OS version, and then follow the directions above for a UNIX installation. Alternatively you can install using fink http://www.finkproject.org/ and http://sourceforge.net/projects/fink/.

As of 2006-01-30 there was a GUI shell for Macintosh at
http://www.inf.ethz.ch/personal/fischerk/LaTeX2rtf/index.html
but now (Nov. 2013) this is not available anymore.

There is a PPC port of an old version 1.9k for Classic MacOS LaTeX2RTF. To convert a LaTeX file using this version, drag the file onto the LaTeX2RTF icon. The translation is best if there are .aux and .bbl files in the same folder as the .tex file to be converted. These should be generated using LaTeX and bibtex.


2.7 Problems Compiling

The code for LaTeX2RTF is standard ANSI C. Some possible pitfalls are


2.8 Problems with make check

All the files in the test directory are converted (with varying degrees of success) using LaTeX2RTF and are tested before most CVS check-ins and with all released tarballs. There will be many warning messages, but there should be no actual error messages. If you do not have a working latex2png script, then some of the files will fail to be translated.


3 Using LaTeX2RTF


3.1 General Assumptions

LaTeX2RTF assumes that the .tex file you want to convert is a valid LaTeX document. The chances of a successful LaTeX2RTF conversion are slightly better than the proverbial snowball’s if the .tex file doesn’t latex properly. Use LaTeX to find and correct errors before using LaTeX2RTF.
LaTeX2RTF also needs the .aux file and .bbl file which are generated by running latex on the .tex file

To correctly convert font names you must edit the fonts.cfg configuration file. This file is used to specify the needed font names and how the LaTeX default font names should be converted to RTF (see Font Configuration). LaTeX variables and user defined commands are not evaluated. They will be simply ignored. To let LaTeX2RTF know the names of variables you can add them in the ignore.cfg file (see Ignore Command).

The environment variable RTFPATH may contain a search path for the support files (all files ending in .cfg). If no file is found during the search in the search-path or if the environment variable is not set, the compiled-in default for the configuration-file directory is used. If the files are not found at all the program aborts.

In the DOS and Windows versions the search path is separated by ‘;’ in the Unix version by ‘:’. For the paths themselves apply ‘\’ and ‘/’. A separator may appear at the beginning or ending of RTFPATH.

Make sure that the configuration files are in the correct directory (or folder). LaTeX2RTF will need at least fonts.cfg, direct.cfg, ignore.cfg, english.cfg. You may have to change one ore more of them to suit your needs (see Configuration).

See Missing options, for actual implementations irregularities.

See Reporting Bugs, for information on how to reach the maintainer.


3.2 LaTeX2RTF Options

The LaTeX2RTF command converts a LaTeX file into RTF text format. The text and much of the formatting information is translated to RTF making the new file look similar to the original. The command line syntax is:

latex2rtf [-options] inputfile[.tex]

for the DOS and Windows versions:

latex2rt [-options] inputfile[.tex]

The options set in the Windows GUI (l2rshell.exe) are inserted as command line options when clicking RUN.

The -options may consist of one or more of the following

-a auxfile

specify an .aux file (for table and figure references) that differs from inputfile.aux. If this is omitted, the name of the inputfile with the suffix replaced .aux'will be taken. You must provide both files (.tex and the .aux) to be able to convert cross-references in a LaTeX file. The .aux is created by running the inputfile.tex through latex.

-b bblfile

Unless an bblfile is specified with the -b option, LaTeX2RTF uses a inputfile.bbl. The bblfile file is used for citations and is typically created by running inputfile.aux through bibtex.

-C codepage

used to specify the character set (code page) used in the LaTeX document. This is only important when non-ansi characters are included in the LaTeX document. Typically this is done in a LaTeX2e file by using \usepackage[codepage]{inputenc} and in this case you need not specify the -C codepage option. If NO \usepackage[codepage]{inputenc} is in the LaTeX2e file, you must inform the converter about the codepage by the -C codepage option. You may select any of the following code pages: ansinew, applemac, cp437, cp437de, cp850, cp852, cp865, decmulti, cp1250, cp1252, latin1, latin2, latin3, latin4, latin5, latin9, next. The default behavior is to use ansinew (code page 1252). Cyrillic support includes conversion of koi8-r, koi8-u, cp1251, cp855, cp866, maccyr, and macukr encodings.

-d debug_level

The -d option determines the amount of debugging information to send to stderr while translating. debug_level=0 means only Errors, ‘1’ Warning Messages (default) also. The debug_level can go as high as ‘7’ for insane amounts of debugging fun. Warnings and error messages are output to stderr and by default listed in the console window. They can be redirected to a file “latex2rtf.log” by appending 2>latex2rtf.log to the command line.

-D dots_per_inch

used to specify the number of dots per inch for equations converted to bitmaps. This value is also used when picture environments are converted to bitmaps as well as when EPS graphics are converted to png files. The default value is 300 dots per inch.

-E#

selects whether figures are included in the rtf (default) or created as external files with the filenames inserted in the rtf text.

The options -E4, -E8 and -E12 are experimental and may not work as expected.

-E0

Do not include any figures in RTF.

-E1

Include figures that need no conversion.

-E2

Include figures that need conversion.

-E3

Include all figures (default).

-E4

Insert filenames for figures that do not need conversion.

-E8

Insert filenames for figures that need conversion.

-E12

Insert filenames for all figures.

With options -E8 and -E12, pdf and ps graphics as well as tikz graphics are converted to eps and the eps filenames inserted in the document text. With -E4 and -E12, bitmap files are inserted in their original format. After opening the rtf in a textprocessing or dtp program, a macro can search for the inserted filenames and insert the files in their places. Further info is in the description of the -M option.

-f#

where # selects which fields to use during conversion:

-f0

do not use fields in RTF. This is handy when primitive RTF editors are being used to view the RTF output.

-f1

use fields for equations but not \ref and \cite.

-f2

use fields for \ref and \cite but not equations. This will be useful for versions of OpenOffice that import cross-references properly (as of Sept 2003 in a soon-to-be released version) but do not properly handle fields in equations.

-f3

use fields when possible. This is the default and is most useful when the RTF file is being exported to be used in Word. This retains the most information from the original LaTeX file.

-F

use LaTeX to create bitmaps for all figures. This may help when figures are not translated properly with the default settings. This typically requires a functional version of ImageMagick on your machine to work properly.

-h

a short usage description

-i language

used to set the idiom or language used by the LaTeX document. Typically, this is specified in a LaTeX2e document by including \usepackage[language]{babel} where language is one of the languages supported by the babel package. All languages listed in the babel system are supported so far as translations for “Chapter,” “References,” and the like. Furthermore, some commands found in the style files for german, french, russian, and czech style are supported (see Language Configuration).

-l

same as -i latin1 (Note that the default behavior is to use ansinew which is a superset of latin1). Included for backwards compatibility.

-M#

where # selects the type of equation conversion. Use

-M1

convert displayed equations to RTF

-M2

convert inline equations to RTF

-M4

convert displayed equations to bitmap

-M8

convert inline equations to bitmap

-M16

insert Word comment field that contains the raw LaTeX equation

-M32

insert the raw latex equation in the RTF text delimited by $ ... $ for inline equations and by \[ ... \] for displayed equations.
This is useful when using version 6 of the MathType equation editor, which converts typed or pasted TeX code into a MathType equation.
Probably this could also be useful for use in OpenOffice, as OO has an equation syntax which partially resembles TeX syntax.

-M64

convert displayed equations to EPS files and insert filenames in RTF text.

-M128

convert inline equations to EPS files and insert filenames in RTF text.

These switches can be combined to get different effects. Handy examples are

-M3

convert both inline and displayed equations to RTF (default)

-M6

convert inline equations to RTF and displayed equations to bitmaps

-M12

convert both inline and displayed equations to bitmaps

-M192

convert both inline and displayed equations to EPS and insert filenames in RTF text

Conversion to bitmaps or eps requires that you have installed a working latex2png script. Producing bitmaps is slow.
When running the DOS version, conversion to bitmaps works for the first 26 equations but fails for the rest with the message
"latex2png: pipe error: Too many open files (EMFILE)".
This is probably a bug in the djgpp 2.04 compiler.
The Windows version, compiled with MinGW, successfully converts at least 500 equations to bitmaps.
When -M64, -M128 or both are specified, equations are converted to individual eps files, the filenames of which are literally inserted in the rtf file, delimited by [###...###]. After loading the rtf file in a text processing program, a macro can be run which searches for "[###" and "###]", extracts the filename, and inserts the eps in that place. The Windows installer package contains the code of such a macro for Word2010 in the file "WordMacro_InsertEPSfromNames.txt" in subfolder "scripts". (This macro may also run on other versions of Word but it was only tested on Word2010.) In Word, the inserted eps graphics display in bad quality on the screen and on non-postscript printers but can be printed in high quality on postscript and pdf printers.

-o outputfile

Unless an outputfile is specified with the -o option, the resulting RTF filename is formed by removing .tex from the inputfile and appending .rtf.

-p

Escape parentheses in mathematical formulas. This has no effect unless EQ fields are being generated. When this option is used, then a ‘(’ or ‘)’ that appears in an EQ field will be preceeded by a backslash. Despite documentation to the contrary (which says that all parentheses should be escaped), adding escapes usually produces a worse result than doing nothing. If Word displays some formulas with parentheses as “Error!”, you might try this option as a last resort. See also the -S option.

This is an option because it will break typesetting equations with non-matching parentheses (because an unmatched unquoted parenthesis would terminate the field).

-P /path/to/cfg

used to specify the folder (i.e. directory) that contains the .cfg files and/or the folder that contains the latex2png script.
Unix, Mac: The folder that contains the latex2png script must be prepended by a ":".
DOS, Windows: The scripts folder is not used, the scripts are always taken from the search path, therefore the folder containing the scripts and the helper programs must be the first in the search path. You can either add it to the search path permanently or add it temporarily by calling l2rprep.bat before starting conversions.
If any of the folder names contains a blank, the folder string must be enclosed in single (Unix, Mac) or double (DOS, Windows) quotes.
Examples:
(Unix:) latex2rtf -P ./cfg/:./scripts/ foo
(DOS/Windows:) latex2rt -P "C:\Program Files\latex2rtf\cfg" foo
Note that without specifying the -P option, LaTeX2RTF tries to find its cfg files in the following locations:
1. the folder specified by the environment variable RTFPATH, if this variable exists;
2. The folder %PROGRAMFILES%\latex2rtf\cfg, if the variable PROGRAMFILES exists – this is the folder in which LaTeX2RTF is installed by the Windows GUI installer with default settings;
3. the folder specified at compilation time by the variable CFGDIR. This is set in the Makefile. The DOS version is compiled with CFGDIR=C:/l2r, the Windows version with CFGDIR=C:/PROGRA~1/latex2rtf.

-se#

selects the scale for equation conversion, where # is the scale factor (default 1.00).

-sf#

selects the scale for figure conversion, where # is the scale factor (default 1.00).

-t#

where # selects the type of table conversion. Use

-t1

convert tables to RTF (default)

-t2

convert tables to bitmaps

-v or -V

prints version information on standard output and exits.

-S

used to specify that semicolons should be used to separate arguments in RTF fields (instead of commas). Typically this is needed when the machine that opens the RTF file has a version of Windows that uses ‘,’ for decimal points.

-T /path/to/tmp

used to specify the folder where to put temporary files. The path can be absolute, e.g. /path/to/tmp or relative to the folder where the .tex input file is in, e.g. tmp or ./tmp.
If you call LaTeX2RTF from the commandline (e.g. under Linux or when called as export filter by LyX), make sure that the tmp folder exists. Only the LaTeX2RTF Windows shell tries to create the tmp folder, the command line program doesn’t.

-W

includes warnings directly in the RTF file

-Z#

add the specified number of extra } to the end of the RTF file. This is useful for files that are not cleanly converted by LaTeX2RTF.

With no arguments other than switches starting with a “-”, LaTeX2RTF acts as a filter, i.e., it reads from stdin and writes to stdout. In addition, diagnostic messages are sent to stderr. If these standard channels are not redirected using < and >, then the input is read from the command line, and both output and error messages are printed on the screen. To redirect warnings and error messages to a file “latex2rtf.log”, append 2>latex2rtf.log to the command line.

If a non-switch argument is present, LaTeX2RTF assumes it is the name of the input file. The file must have extension “.tex” but the extension is optional. The output file is constructed from the input file name by removing the extension “.tex” and adding “.rtf”.


3.3 Debugging

With the -d option you can specify how much processing information LaTeX2RTF reports. If there is a logfile specified the output goes to this file. Nonetheless Warnings and Errors are logged to stderr always. They can be redirected to a file “latex2rtf.log” by appending 2>latex2rtf.log to the command line.

Possible values of -d are

  1. only errors.
  2. Translation Warnings (default).
  3. shows preparsing of sections
  4. Reasonably high level debugging messages
  5. Show all function calls
  6. Show each character as it is processed
  7. Show processing of characters as they are output as well

4 Features

In this chapter you find what styles is LaTeX2RTF supposed to translate correctly to RTF.


4.1 LaTeX2e

LaTeX2RTF understands most of the commands introduced with LaTeX2e. It translates both the old 2.09 version of \documentstyle[options]{format#} and the newer \documentclass[options]{format}.


4.2 Unicode Support

As of version 1.9.17 and up, LaTeX2RTF has limited unicode support. LaTeX files that use unicode sequences are just emitted directly into the RTF file.
Symbols and odd characters in math sequences may also be converted to a unicode sequence. Some of them need the STIXGeneral fonts (see Math and Special Symbols) to be installed on the system where the rtf file is to be displayed or printed.

Support for unicode encoded input is activated by the LaTeX command
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
or
\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}.


4.3 Input Encoding

It is not necesary to specify the -C option if you use \usepackage{isolatin1} or \documentstyle[isolatin1]{...}. LaTeX2RTF automagically detects these packages/style options and switches to processing of ISO-Latin1 codes. The following encodings are supported: ansinew, applemac, cp437, cp437de, cp850, cp852, cp865, decmulti, cp1250, cp1252, latin1, latin2, latin3, latin4, latin5, latin9, next, koi8-r, koi8-u, cp1251, cp855, cp866, maccyr, macukr, utf8, and utf8x. The encoding used in RTF files is cp1252. If cyrillic fonts are present, then these are represented in the RTF file using cp1251 (Windows Cyrillic).


4.4 Language Support

The following languages from the Babel package are supported: afrikaans, german, nynorsk, spanish, bahasa, dutch, icelandic, polish, swedish, basque, english, portuges, turkish, brazil, esperanto, irish, romanian, usorbian, breton, estonian, italian, samin, welsh, catalan, finnish, latin, scottish, croatian, lsorbian, serbian, czech, french, magyar, slovak, danish, galician, norsk, slovene.

The only thing that these files do is to translate various words usually emitted by LaTeX during processing. For example, this ensures that the LaTeX2RTF will provide the correct translation of the word “Chapter” in the converted document.

You can select any of the above languages using the -l option. This is not needed if your LaTeX file contains \usepackage[language]{babel}.

Encountering the german package or babel option (by H. Partl of the Vienna University) makes LaTeX2RTF behave like that: German Quotes, German Umlauts by "a, etc... This support is programmed directly into LaTeX2RTF and supporting similar features for other languages will require patching the source code.

There is similar support for french packages.

There is reasonable support for english, latin1, latin2, and cyrillic languages.

See Language Configuration, for details on how to write a language.cfg file for your language by yourself.


4.5 Cross References

Cross references include everything that you might expect and then some: bibliographic citations, equation references, table references, figure references, and section references. Section, equation, table and figure references are implemented by placing RTF bookmarks around the equation number (or table number or figure number).

Page references work but are implemented as “warm” cross-references. This means that Word does not automatically update the page references when the file is opened. To update the page references you must select the entire document (in Word) and press F9.

Bibliographic references currently require that a valid .aux file be present. This is where LaTeX2RTF obtains the reference numbers. It would be nice if LaTeX2RTF just automatically numbered the references when there was no .aux file, but LaTeX2RTF does not do this yet.

LaTeX2RTF relies on BibTeX to convert and format bibliographic entries. Usually the style file for a particular BibTeX format does not use any special LaTeX commands and therefore the bibliography file file.bbl can be processed by LaTeX2RTF without difficulty. As a consequence, LaTeX2RTF can handle most bibliography styles without problem.

There are several latex style packages that add additional latex commands to enhance bibliographic formatting. LaTeX2RTF currently supports the following bibliographic packages:
apacite, apalike, authordate, harvard, natbib (also with apanat1b). These packages have many, many options and you may encounter problems with formatting in special cases.

As of LaTeX2RTF 1.9.17 and up, the natbib command bibpunct is supported.

Footnotes are implemented and appear at the bottom of each page.

Indexing is reasonably-well supported. The simple mark-up of makeindex

\index{topic!subtopic@\textit{subtopic}}

is supported. The rest of the fancy indexing stuff is not implemented. The index is created at the location of the \printindex command. When a file with an index is first opened in Word, you must select the entire file and update the page references and fields by pressing F9.

Currently, there is no support for \labels of \items in enumerate environments.

The conversion of cross-references is not perfect because of the different mechanisms in the LaTeX and Word worlds. In particular, if there are multiple \label in a figure, table, or section environment then only the first gets processed. It is also possible to confuse the LaTeX2RTF in eqnarray environments.


4.6 Page Formatting

LaTeX2RTF will handle some basic page formatting options, including \doublespacing (as implemented in the setspace package), and the margin setting options provided by the geometry package including commands in the ratio, centering and margin families. Not all geometry options are implemented yet, in part because there are no corresponding rtf commands for many of them.


4.7 Equations

There are six separate levels of equation translation based on the -M switch, see LaTeX2RTF Options. Each equation is converted either to an EQ field or to a bitmap or inserted as raw TeX code in the document or converted to an eps file with the eps file name inserted in the document text delimited by [###...###].

This is an interim solution (for some definition of “interim”). Ideally the equations would become OLE equation objects in the RTF file, but this needs to be implemented.

Some functions in the EQ fields have two or more parameters with a separator between each two. Unfortunately, the interpretation of these separators depends on the country specific settings in the MS Windows system in which the rtf file is opened. e.g. in English versions of MS Windows, the default parameter separator is the comma, in German versions the default is the semicolon. If the parameter in the RTF file does not match the Windows setting, some EQ fields are not interpreted correctly. You can check and set the separator in [Windows control panel - country settings - numbers - list separator]. By default, LaTeX2RTF uses the comma as separator. If LaTeX2RTF is called with the command line parameter -S , the semicolon is inserted as parameter delimiter.

Theoretically, according to the Word help file, parentheses ‘(’ or ‘)’ in mathematical formulas should be escaped (by a preceding backslash). Despite this, adding escapes usually produces a worse result than doing nothing. If Word displays some formulas with parentheses as “Error!”, you might try the -p option as a last resort.

It is also possible to convert an EQ field generated by LaTeX2RTF to an Equation Editor object by opening the rtf file in Word and double-clicking on the equation. However there are bugs in the interface between Word and Equation Editor which prevent symbols in font Symbol or MTExtra to be converted correctly. The full commercial version of the Equation Editor, called MathType, handles this conversion correctly.

If you have MathType version 6 or later, an even better way to convert LaTeX equations to MathType is letting LaTeX2RTF write the LaTeX code of the equations verbatim in the rtf file (option -M32), then open the rtf file in Word, select the LaTeX code of an equation, cut it to the clipboard, open MathType, and paste the code. MathType will convert the code into an equation. Wilfried tried to automate this in a Word macro, but this fails because the macro does not wait until MathType is started and ready to receive the pasted code. Maybe the MathType authors will give us a hint or provide such a macro.

MathType can be downloaded from http://www.dessci.com/ (30 day test version).


4.8 Math and Special Symbols

The way that symbols are converted in the RTF is based on the following observations. If the symbol is found in the latin 1 character set, then the current font is used, else the unicode code is inserted in the rtf code. (Implemented since version 2.1.0)

The means that on the system where the .rtf file is opened, a unicode font should be available or these glyphs will not be displayed correctly. As only the STIX fonts contain all needed characters, these fonts should be installed on the system where the rtf file is to be displayed or printed.

Many mathematical and special symbols are directly supported by LaTeX2RTF. Less common symbols (not found in the standard font) are supported by the conversion table in the file direct.cfg, see Direct Conversion.

Required fonts are:


4.9 Tables

Conversion of tabular and tabbing environments is somewhat lame. The main difficulty is that LaTeX (and html) will size the columns of a table automatically. There is no such feature in RTF. Consequently, the conversion defaults to making all the columns have equal size. This is suboptimal and should be revised.

Another way is to use the option -t2 to make latex render them as bitmaps and insert the bitmaps into the RTF file. This feature was added in version 1.9.19.


4.10 Graphics

There is now rudimentary support for \includegraphics. Three file types will be inserted into the RTF file without needing conversion: .pict, .jpeg, and .png files. EPS and PDF files are converted to PNG using convert from the ImageMagick package. Some options are even handled properly.


4.11 Pagestyles

If there is no \pagestyle command, the RTF output is generated as with plain pagestyle, i.e. each page has its page number centered at the bottom.

You must turn this off with the \pagestyle{empty} command in the LaTeX file if you don’t want pagenumbers. The headings and myheadings styles are silently ignored by now. The twosided option to the \documentstyle or \documentclass produces the corresponding RTF tokens. Note that these features require RTF Version 1.4.


4.12 Hyperlatex

Hyperlatex support is largely broken at the moment, but continues to improve.

Otfried Schwarzkopf has created the “Hyperlatex Markup Language” which is a “little package that allows you to use LaTeX to prepare documents in HTML.” It brings an Emacs lisp program with it to convert the Hyperlatex file to HTML. Hyperlatex can be obtained from the CTAN-sites, see Obtaining LaTeX2RTF. There are two convenient commands that avoid typing: \link and \xlink that generate an “internal” label which then is used in the following \Ref and \Pageref commands.

LaTeX makes it possible to write ‘\link{anchor}[ltx]{label}’, which typesets: ‘anchor ltx’. LaTeX2RTF does NOT support this aproach since the optional parameter is thrown away right now, see LaTeX2RTF under Development.

Note that you have to update your .cfg files if you are upgrading, since there are a lot of HTML oriented commands in Hyperlatex that we simply can ‘ignore’.


4.13 APA Support

Some APA citation styles are supported, see Citation Commands

Support for APA text formatting is only rudimentary at the moment (headings without numbering). If you want to format a document according to APA, rename cfg/style.cfg to style_sav.cfg and rename cfg/styleAPA.cfg to style.cfg before starting LaTeX2RTF.


5 Configuration


5.1 Input processing

On processing input LaTeX2RTF first converts the LaTeX special characters. If it encounters one of the standard commands it is converted internally. If a command is not known to LaTeX2RTF it is first looked up in direct.cfg and the RTF code specified there is output. If not found there it is looked up in the section ignore.cfg. This file includes a lot of LaTeX commands that do not affect the output (cross reference information and the like), or that we are not able or willing to convert to RTF.

You can use ignore.cfg if you get tired of seeing

WARNING: command: `foo' not found - ignored

and you don’t need ‘foo’ in your RTF document. It would be nice to send your additions to the LaTeX2RTF mailing list for inclusion in later distributions.

LaTeX2RTF accepts Unix, MS-DOS, and Macintosh line ending codes (\n, \r\n and \r). The files it creates get the line ending for the platform on which LaTeX2RTF was compiled.

The LaTeX file may have been created with a wide variety of character sets. If the LaTeX lacks the \package[codepage]{inputenc} definition, then you may need to use the command line switch to manually select the proper code page (see Input Encoding).


5.2 Conditional Parsing

Starting with LaTeX2RTF 1.9.18, there is a handy method for controlling which content should be processed by LaTeX or by LaTeX2RTF. Control is achieved using the standard \if facility of TeX. If you include the following line in the preamble of your document (i.e., before \begin{document})

\newif\iflatextortf

Then you will create a new \iflatextortf command in LaTeX. TeX sets the value of this to false by default. Now, LaTeX2RTF internally sets \iflatextortf to be true, and to ensure that this is always the case, LaTeX2RTF ignores the command \latextortffalse. This means that you can control how different applications process your document by

\iflatextortf
This code is processed only by latex2rtf
\else
This code is processed only by latex
\fi

Note that \iflatextortf will only work within a section; you cannot use this command to conditionally parse code that crosses section boundaries. Also, it will only work on complete table or figure environments. Due to the mechanism used by LaTeX2RTF in processing these environments, at this time the only way to conditionally parse tables and figures is to include two complete versions of the environment in question, nested within an appropriate \iflatex2rtf structure.

LaTeX2RTF versions 1.9.15 to 1.9.18 had the ability to hide contents from LaTeX but expose them to LaTeX2RTF by starting a line with %latex2rtf:. This code was horribly broken, and it was removed. The same functionality is readily achieved using the \iflatextortf mechanism. For example, the old method allowed

%latex2rtf: This line will only appear in the latex2rtf output, 

To get the same behavior, define \iflatextortf and use

\iflatextortf
This code is processed only by latex2rtf
\fi

5.3 Output Formatting

On writing output, LaTeX2RTF generates the operating system specific line ending code (\n on Unix, \r\n on DOS or Windows), depending on which system LaTeX2RTF was compiled. As both should be legal to any RTF Reader the resulting RTF rendering should not be affected.

LaTeX2RTF does not offer a whole lot of flexibility in how files are translated, but it does offer some. This flexibility resides in four files direct.cfg, ignore.cfg, fonts.cfg, and language.cfg. These filese are documented in the next four sections.


5.4 Direct Conversion

The file direct.cfg is used for converting LaTeX commands by simple text replacement. The format consists of lines with a LaTeX command with backslash followed by comma. The rest of the line until a ‘.’ character will be written to the RTF file when the command is found in the LaTeX file. Lines starting with a ‘#’ character are ignored. After the ‘.’ everything is ignored to end of line. To select a specific font use *fontname*, where fontname be defined in fonts.cfg. To write the ‘*’ character use ‘**’.

\bigstar,{\u8727**}.
\copyright,\'a9.

In general, specific fonts should not be specified in this file. There is a mechanism to do this, but it turns out that this is not as useful as originally thought. The main reason that this fails is because the conversion of equations from Word fields to Equation Editor objects is buggy. The consequence is that to have symbols show up properly, they must be encoded differently when the Symbol and MT Extra fonts are used — depending on whether Word fields are active or not. It was all very tedious to figure out a mechanism that was “least broken.”


5.5 Ignore Command

The file ignore.cfg is used for defining how to ignore specific commands. This file is used for recognition of LaTeX variables, user defined variables, and some simple commands. All variables are ignored but the converter must know the names to correctly ignore assignments to variables. Lines in this file consist of a variable name with backslash, followed by comma and the type of the variable followed by ‘.’. Possible types are

NUMBER

simple numeric value

MEASURE

numeric value with following unit of measure

OTHER

ignores anything to the first character after ‘=’ and from there to next space. e.g., \setbox\bak=\hbox

COMMAND

ignores anything to next ‘\’ and from there to the occurence of anything but a letter e.g., \newbox\bak

SINGLE

ignores single command e.g., \noindent

PARAMETER

ignores a command with one parameter e.g., \foo{bar}

PACKAGE

does not produce a Warning message if PACKAGE is encountered, e.g., ‘\kleenex,PACKAGE.’ ignores ‘\usepackage{kleenex}

ENVCMD

intended to process contents of unknown environment as if it were plain LaTeX, e.g. ‘\environ,ENVCMD.
Therefore ‘\begin{environ} text \end{environ}’ would be converted to ‘text’. Doesn’t work in LaTeX2RTF version 2.1.0 up to and including 2.3.4.

ENVIRONMENT

ignores contents of that environment, e.g., with ‘\ifhtml,ENVIRONMENT.”, ‘\begin{ifhtml} text \end{ifhtml}’ ignores ‘text’.

The types are in upper case exactly as above. Do not use spaces. Lines starting with a ‘#’ character are ignored. After the ‘.’ everything is ignored to end of line. Example:

\pagelength,MEASURE.

5.6 Font Configuration

The file fonts.cfg contains the font name mapping. For example, this file determines what font is used to represent \rm characters in the RTF file.

A line consists of a font name in LaTeX followed by comma and a font name in RTF. The end is marked by a ‘.’. No spaces are allowed. The LaTeX font will be converted to the RTF font when it is found in the LaTeX file. If multiple translations for the same LaTeX font are specified, only the first is used. All fonts in a LaTeX file that are not in this file will be mapped to the default font. All RTF fonts listed in this file will be in every RTF file header whether used or not. Lines starting with a ‘#’ character are ignored. After the ‘.’ everything is ignored to end of line.

To add a RTF font not used as substitute for a LaTeX font — for example a Symbol font used in direct.cfg — use a dummy LaTeX name like in the following

Dummy3,MathematicalSymbols.

Make sure you use the correct font name. Take care of spaces in font names. The default fonts are named Roman \rm, Slanted \sl, Sans Serif \sf, Typewriter \tt, or Calligraphic \cal.


5.7 Language Configuration

The file(s) language.cfg control the translation of LaTeX’s “hardcoded” sectioning names. The standard LaTeX styles have some fixed Title names like ‘Part’, ‘Reference’ or ‘Bibliography’ that appeared in English or German in the output with the original versions of LaTeX2RTF.

It is unlikely that you will need to create a new language.cfg file. However, just look at one of the existing files and follow the pattern. The format is really simple.


6 Error Messages and Logging

As stated in the Debugging section, LaTeX2RTF provides a means to control the amount of debugging information through the -d# switch. By using a debugging level of 4, you can get a pretty good idea of what LaTeX command caused the problem and what line that command might be found on. Warnings and error messages are output to stderr and by default listed in the console window. They can be redirected to a file “latex2rtf.log” by appending 2>latex2rtf.log to the command line.

Fatal error messages

indicate a bug in the source code. PLEASE report them, if they do not apear in the documentation (see Reporting Bugs).

Error messages

always abort the program and are caused by conditions that prevent further conversion of the input file. Typically this is cause by LaTeX2RTF getting hopelessly confused by the number of braces in the LaTeX file.

Warning messages

inform you, that there is some conversion loss from LaTeX to RTF, or that the output file has some restrictions on some RTF Readers. Most of these warnings can be supressed by add the offending command to the ignore.cfg file.

Error and Warning messages should follow the GNU Coding standards, i.e. they have the format

inputfile':line: Error|Warning: message

You can also control the level of debugging output by inserting \verbositylevel{#} in the LaTeX file. This is very handy if you have a large LaTeX file that is failing in only a small section. For example,

problem free latex file ....
\verbositylevel{5}
problematic code
\verbositylevel{0}

will cause a huge amount of debugging information to be emitted for the problematic code.

Error reporting and logging still has many inconsistencies, but it gets better with each release. Don’t try to make any sense in debugging levels above 4, these are for my own delight only and can change significantly between versions.

The inputfile may be incorrectly identified if it is incorporated through \input or \include. The line may be also be wrong at times. See Known Bugs.


7 History & Copyright

In 1994 the first Version of LaTeX2RTF was written by Fernando Dorner and Andreas Granzer of the Viena University supervised by Ralf Schlatterbeck in a one-semester course. They created a simple LaTeX parser and added most of the infrastructure for the program. This was version 1.0 of LaTeX2RTF. In 1995, work on LaTeX2RTF was continued in another one-semester course by Friedrich Polzer and Gerhard Trisko. The result was LaTeX2RTF version 1.5. Ralf Schlatterbeck (ralf “at” zoo.priv.at) maintained and extended LaTeX2RTF until 1998.

In 1998 Georg Lehner (jorge_lehner “at” gmx.net) found the reference to LaTeX2RTF on the TeX Conversion Webpage of Wilfried Hennings and added some functionality and took over the maintainence of the program. The last version release by Georg is 1.8aa. The bulk of development post 1.8aa was done by Scott Prahl. Wilfried Hennings now coordinates the development of the program and maintains the project on SourceForge where there are also (low volume) mailing lists for users and developers. Mailing via one of these lists requires subscription to the list (to prevent spam). For subscription to these lists visit the page: users list or developers list

As of Januar 2017, version 2.3.12 of LaTeX2RTF is available.

The contents of this manual were composed by copying shamelessly what was available in the original sources and documentation.


8 LaTeX2RTF under Development


8.1 Unimplemented Features


8.2 Missing options

Missing or buggy command line options.

-d

Information logging and Error reporting is not implemented consistently. Need to test and track problems with the linenumber and with the file name.

--long_names

It would be useful to implement the GNU long option names, e.g.: ‘–debug’, ‘–output_file’, ‘–quiet’, etc. This could be done by switching to the GNU getopt package.


8.3 Known Bugs

  1. The first parameter of a \link{anchor}[ltx]{label} is converted to the rtf-output. Label is stored to hyperref for later use, the optional parameter is ignored. [ltx] should be processed as Otfried recommends it, to use for exclusive LaTeX output.e.g: \link{readhere}[~\Ref]{explaining: chapter}. Since {explaining:chapter} is yet read by LaTeX and hyperlatex when [...] is evaluated it produces the correct reference. LaTeX2RTF is only strolling from left to right through the text and can’t remember what she will see in the future.
  2. The diagnostics routine does not output the correct (actual) input filename. (‘.aux’, ‘.bbl’, \input).

8.4 Reporting Bugs

Report bugs to to the bug tracking system at SourceForge. Only report bugs for the latest version of LaTeX2RTF that is available. Please provide the following information and observe the following guidelines when reporting a bug in the program:

  1. State the version of LaTeX2RTF that you are using. You can get the version by specifying the -V option to LaTeX2RTF.
  2. Specify the your operating system and version. Be sure to check the file ‘Makefile’ for settings that may be specific to your machine, especially for some versions of SunOS there may be settings which are needed to compile successfully. Do this before submitting a bug report.
  3. If the program produces wrong output or does not work for you, include a short LaTeX file along with a description of the problem. Isolating the bug into a small LaTeX file does two things. First, it provides a file that can be used to test future versions of LaTeX2RTF and second, it certainly improves the chances that the bug will get some attention. Do not send me large LaTeX or RTF files, I simply do not have the time to wade through large files to search for a bug!
  4. Be patient. I am maintaining the program in my free time. I did not write most of the code. Often I do not have the time to answer to your question. I will, however, try to fix reported bugs in upcoming releases.

8.5 Todo List

Scott’s ToDo list

Georg’s todo list


8.6 Command List

Listed here are all the LaTeX commands currently parsed by LaTeX2RTF. Note: inclusion in this list does not mean that a command is fully and correctly handled by LaTeX2RTF. In some cases the commands here are place-holders only, and are not implemented at all. The list is provided to encourage developers to note any departures from the behaviour that LaTeX users will expect. The location of the commands is noted to assist anyone interested in hacking on the C source code. This list is a work in progress, and may not be immediately useful to general users, other than to indicate those commands that we have at least contemplated implementing.


8.6.1 General Commands

These commands are found in the commands[] array in commands.c. They are arranged alphabetically within sections according to function.


8.6.1.1 Basic Commands

All listed commands work as expected.

begin
centerline
end
endnote
footnote
raggedright
the
today
vcenter

8.6.1.2 Font Commands

All listed commands work as expected.

bf
bfseries
cal
em
emph
enotesize
footnotesize
HUGE
Huge
huge
it
itshape
LARGE
Large
large
mathbf
mathcal
mathit
mathmd
mathnormal
mathrm
mathsc
mathsf
mathsl
mathtt
mathup
mdseries
mit
normalfont
normalsize
rm
rmfamily
sc
scfamily
scriptsize
scshape
sf
sffamily
sl
slshape
small
ssmall
textbf
textfont
textit
textmd
textnormal
textrm
textsc
textsf
textsl
texttt
textup
tiny
tt
ttfamily
underbar
underline
upshape

8.6.1.3 Logos

All listed commands work as expected.

AmSLaTeX
AmSTeX
BibTeX
kern
LaTeX
latex
LaTeXe
lower
LyX
SLiTeX
TeX

8.6.1.4 Special Characters

These commands all work as expected.

\
acute
b
bar
breve
c
check
d
ddot
dot
grave
H
hat
i
j
l
L
r
tilde
u
v
vec

8.6.1.5 Sectioning Commands

chapter
chapter*
paragraph
paragraph*
part
part*
section
section*
subparagraph
subparagraph*
subsection
subsection*
subsubsection
subsubsection*

8.6.1.6 Uncategorized

These commands need to be organized into new or existing sections.

abstract
addcontents

Ignored

addcontentsline

Ignored

addvspace

Ignored

aleph
Alph
alph

Ignored

alpha
Alpha

Ignored

amalg
and
angle
appendix

Ignored

approx
arabic

Ignored

ast
author
baselineskip
because
beta
Beta
bibentry
bibitem
bibliography
bibliographystyle
bibliographystyle

Ignored

bigskip
bot
BoxedEPSF
bullet
cap
caption
cdot
cdots
centering
char
chi
Chi
circ
cite
citeonline
cleardoublepage
clearpage
clubsuit
cong
contentsline
coprod
cup
date
ddots
delta
Delta
dfrac
Diamond
diamondsuit
div
doteq
dotfill

There is no rtf code for dotfill; LaTeX2RTF inserts an ellipsis only.

dots
dots
downarrow
Downarrow
efloatseparator
ell
emptyset
endinput
endnotemark

Ignored

ensuremath
epsfbox
epsffile
epsilon
eqref
equiv
eta
exists
fbox
fbox
fnsymbol

Ignored

footnotemark

Ignored

forall
frac
Frac
framebox

Ignored

frenchspacing

Ignored

gamma
Gamma
ge
geq
gg
glossary

Ignored

glossaryentry

Ignored

hbar
hbox
heartsuit
hsize
hslash
hspace

Ignored

hspace*

Ignored

htmladdnormallink
htmlref
iiint
iint
Im
in
include
includegraphics
includegraphics*
includeonly

Ignored

indent
index
indexentry

Ignored

infty
input
int
int
iota
kappa
label
lambda
Lambda
land
langle
lceil
ldots
le
left
leftarrow
Leftarrow
leftharpoondown
leftleftarrows
leftrightarrow
Leftrightarrow
leftrightarrows
leq
let

Ignored

letterspace
lfloor
lim
liminf
limsup
linebreak

Ignored

lineskip
listoffigures
listoftables
ll
longleftarrow
longleftrightarrows
longrightarrow
lor
makebox

Ignored

maketitle
mapsto
marginpar

Ignored

markboth

Ignored

markright

Ignored

matrix
mbox
measuredangle
medskip
mho
moveleft
moveright
mp
mu
multicolumn
nabla
ne
nearrow
neg
neq
newblock
newcount

Ignored

newfont

Ignored

newpage
newsavebox

Ignored

nobibliography

Ignored

nobreakspace
nocite
noindent
nolinebreak

Ignored

nonfrenchspacing

Ignored

nonumber
nopagebreak

Ignored

notag
nu
numberline
nwarrow
omega
Omega
omicron
onecolumn
onlinecite
oplus
oslash
otimes
output

Ignored

overline
pagebreak
pagenumbering

Ignored

pageref
pagestyle

Ignored

par
parbox
partial
perp
phi
Phi
pi
Pi
pm
prec
printindex
prod
prod
propto
protect

Ignored

psfig
psfrag

Ignored

psi
Psi
qquad
quad
raisebox

Ignored

rangle
rceil
Re
ref
refstepcounter
rfloor
rho
right
Rightarrow
rightarrow
rightharpoonup
rightleftarrows
rightleftharpoons
rightrightarrows
Roman

Ignored

roman

Ignored

rule
samepage

Ignored

savebox

Ignored

sbox

Ignored

searrow
setbox
settowidth

Ignored

sigma
Sigma
sim
simeq
smallskip
spadesuit
sqrt
stackrel
stepcounter

Ignored

stretch

Ignored

subset
subseteq
succ
sum
sum
supset
supseteq
surd
swarrow
tableofcontents
tau
textalpha
textbeta
textbullet
textchi
textcolor
textDelta
textdelta
textellipsis
textepsilon
texteta
textGamma
textgamma
textiota
textkappa
textLambda
textlambda
textmu
textnu
textOmega
textomega
textperiodcentered
textPhi
textphi
textPi
textpi
textPsi
textpsi
textSigma
textsigma
textsubscript
textsuperscript
textTau
texttau
textTheta
texttheta
textXi
textxi
textzeta
thanks
therefore
Theta
theta
tikzpicture
times
title
to
triangleleft
triangleright
twocolumn
typeaout

Ignored

Typein

Ignored

typein

Ignored

typeout

Ignored

Uparrow
uparrow
updownarrow
Updownarrow
upsilon
Upsilon
url
usebox

Ignored

value
varepsilon
varnothing
varphi
varpi
varpropto
varsigma
vartheta
vbox
vdots
vee
verb
verb*
vref
vsize
vskip
vspace
vspace*
wedge
wp
xi
Xi
zeta

8.6.2 Preamble Commands

These commands are found in PreambleCommands[] in commands.c, and are implemented in preamble.c.

addtocounter
addtolength
baselineskip
celsius
cfoot
chead
cline
DeclareRobustCommand
DeclareRobustCommand*
def
degreecelsius
documentclass
documentstyle
doublespacing

Currently, the only command from the setspace package that is implemented, and the only way to modify line spacing.

endnotetext
EUR
euro
evensidemargin
fancyfoot
fancyhead
flushbottom
footnotetext
geometry

Currently recognizes *ratio, *centering, *margin, left, right, inner, outer, top, bottom, right, left (including vmargin, hratio etc.)

headheight
headsep
hline
hoffset
htmladdnormallink
htmlref
hyphenation
iflatextortf
ifx
include
input
latextortffalse

Ignored

latextortftrue

Ignored

lfoot
lhead
listoffiles

Ignored

makeglossary

Ignored

makeindex

Ignored

makelabels

Ignored

markboth

Ignored

markright

Ignored

newcommand
newcounter
newenvironment
newif
newlength
newtheorem
nobreakspace
nofiles

Ignored

oddsidemargin
pagenumbering

Ignored

pagestyle
parindent
parskip
providecommand
raggedbottom
renewcommand
renewenvironment
renewtheorem

Ignored

resizebox
resizebox*
rfoot
rhead
setcounter
setlength
signature
textheight
textwidth
theendnotes
thepage
thispagestyle

Ignored

topmargin
usepackage
verbositylevel
voffset

8.6.3 Letter Commands

Found in LetterCommands[] in commands.c.

address
cc
closing
encl
opening
ps
signature

8.6.4 Language Commands


8.6.4.1 German Commands

Found in GermanModeCommands[] in commands.c.

ck
glqq
glq
grq
grqq

8.6.4.2 Czech Commands

uv

8.6.4.3 French Commands

deuxpoints
dittomark
FCS
fg
fup
ieme
iemes
ier
iere
ieres
iers
inferieura
LCS
lq
lqq
numero
Numero
numeros
Numeros
og
pointexclamation
pointinterrogation
pointvirgule
primo
quarto
rq
rqq
secundo
superieura
tertio
up

8.6.4.4 Russian Commands

CYRA
cyra
CYRB
cyrb
CYRC
cyrc
CYRCH
cyrch
CYRCHSH
cyrchsh
CYRD
cyrd
CYRE
cyre
CYREREV
cyrerev
CYRERY
cyrery
CYRF
cyrf
CYRG
cyrg
CYRH
cyrh
CYRHRDSN
cyrhrdsn
CYRI
cyri
CYRISHRT
cyrishrt
CYRK
cyrk
CYRL
cyrl
CYRM
cyrm
CYRN
cyrn
CYRO
cyro
CYRP
cyrp
CYRR
cyrr
CYRS
cyrs
CYRSFTSN
cyrsftsn
CYRSH
cyrsh
CYRT
cyrt
CYRU
cyru
CYRV
cyrv
CYRYA
cyrya
CYRYU
cyryu
CYRZ
cyrz
CYRZH
cyrzh

8.6.5 Citation Commands


8.6.5.1 Apacite Commands

AX
BAnd
BBA
BBAA
BBAB
BBAY
BBC
BBCP
BBCQ
BBN
BBOP
BBOQ
BCAY
BCBL
BCBT
BCHAIR
BCHAIRS
BCnt
BCntIP
BED
BEd
BEDS
Bem
BIP
BMTh
BNUM
BNUMS
BOthers
BOWP
BPG
BPGS
BPhD
BREPR
BTR
BTRANS
BTRANSS
BUMTh
BUPhD
BVOL
BVOLS
citeA
citeauthor
citeNP
citeyear
citeyearNP
fullcite
fullciteA
fullciteauthor
fullciteNP
shortcite
shortciteA
shortciteauthor
shortciteNP

8.6.5.2 AuthorDate Commands

citename
shortcite

8.6.5.3 Harvard Commands

cite
citeaffixed
citeasnoun
citename
citeyear
citeyear*
harvardand
harvarditem
harvardyearleft
harvardyearright
possessivecite

8.6.5.4 HyperLatex Commands

Cite
link
Pageref
Ref
S
xlink

8.6.5.5 Apacite Commands

bibpunct
cite
citealp
Citealp
citealp*
citealt
Citealt
citealt*
citeauthor
Citeauthor
citeauthor*
citep
Citep
citep*
citet
Citet
citet*
citetext
citeyear
citeyearpar

8.6.6 Acronym Commands

usepackage [options] {acronym}
ac
acfi
acro
acrodef
acrodefplural
acused

8.6.7 Other Commands

Other Commands:
item
caption
center


8.6.8 Environments

Environments processed - found in params[] in commands.c.

abstract
acknowledgments
align
align*
alltt
array
bf
bfseries
center
comment
compactenum
compactitem
description
displaymath
document
em
enumerate
eqnarray
eqnarray*
equation
equation*
figure
figure*
flushleft
flushright
htmlonly

Ignored

it
itemize
itshape
landscape
latexonly

Ignored

letter
list
longtable
longtable*
math
mdseries
minipage
multicolumn
music
picture
quotation
quote
rawhtml

Ignored

rm
rmfamily
sc
scshape
sf
sffamily
sl
sloppypar
slshape
small
tabbing
table
table*
tabular
tabular*
thebibliography
theindex

Ignored

titlepage
tt
ttfamily
verbatim
Verbatim
verse

9 Function Index

Jump to:   \  
A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Z  
Index Entry  Section

\
\: Special Characters

A
abstract: Uncategorized
abstract: Environments
ac: Acronym Commands
acfi: Acronym Commands
acknowledgments: Environments
acro: Acronym Commands
acrodef: Acronym Commands
acrodefplural: Acronym Commands
acused: Acronym Commands
acute: Special Characters
addcontents: Uncategorized
addcontentsline: Uncategorized
address: Letter Commands
addtocounter: Preamble Commands
addtolength: Preamble Commands
addvspace: Uncategorized
aleph: Uncategorized
align: Environments
align*: Environments
alltt: Environments
Alph: Uncategorized
alph: Uncategorized
alpha: Uncategorized
Alpha: Uncategorized
amalg: Uncategorized
AmSLaTeX: Logos
AmSTeX: Logos
and: Uncategorized
angle: Uncategorized
appendix: Uncategorized
approx: Uncategorized
arabic: Uncategorized
array: Environments
ast: Uncategorized
author: Uncategorized
AX: Apacite Commands

B
b: Special Characters
BAnd: Apacite Commands
bar: Special Characters
baselineskip: Uncategorized
baselineskip: Preamble Commands
BBA: Apacite Commands
BBAA: Apacite Commands
BBAB: Apacite Commands
BBAY: Apacite Commands
BBC: Apacite Commands
BBCP: Apacite Commands
BBCQ: Apacite Commands
BBN: Apacite Commands
BBOP: Apacite Commands
BBOQ: Apacite Commands
BCAY: Apacite Commands
BCBL: Apacite Commands
BCBT: Apacite Commands
BCHAIR: Apacite Commands
BCHAIRS: Apacite Commands
BCnt: Apacite Commands
BCntIP: Apacite Commands
because: Uncategorized
BED: Apacite Commands
BEd: Apacite Commands
BEDS: Apacite Commands
begin: Basic Commands
Bem: Apacite Commands
beta: Uncategorized
Beta: Uncategorized
bf: Font Commands
bf: Environments
bfseries: Font Commands
bfseries: Environments
bibentry: Uncategorized
bibitem: Uncategorized
bibliography: Uncategorized
bibliographystyle: Uncategorized
bibliographystyle: Uncategorized
bibpunct: Natbib Commands
BibTeX: Logos
bigskip: Uncategorized
BIP: Apacite Commands
BMTh: Apacite Commands
BNUM: Apacite Commands
BNUMS: Apacite Commands
bot: Uncategorized
BOthers: Apacite Commands
BOWP: Apacite Commands
BoxedEPSF: Uncategorized
BPG: Apacite Commands
BPGS: Apacite Commands
BPhD: Apacite Commands
BREPR: Apacite Commands
breve: Special Characters
BTR: Apacite Commands
BTRANS: Apacite Commands
BTRANSS: Apacite Commands
bullet: Uncategorized
BUMTh: Apacite Commands
BUPhD: Apacite Commands
BVOL: Apacite Commands
BVOLS: Apacite Commands

C
c: Special Characters
cal: Font Commands
cap: Uncategorized
caption: Uncategorized
cc: Letter Commands
cdot: Uncategorized
cdots: Uncategorized
celsius: Preamble Commands
center: Environments
centering: Uncategorized
centerline: Basic Commands
cfoot: Preamble Commands
chapter: Sectioning Commands
chapter*: Sectioning Commands
char: Uncategorized
chead: Preamble Commands
check: Special Characters
chi: Uncategorized
Chi: Uncategorized
circ: Uncategorized
cite: Uncategorized
cite: Harvard Commands
Cite: HyperLatex Commands
cite: Natbib Commands
citeA: Apacite Commands
citeaffixed: Harvard Commands
citealp: Natbib Commands
Citealp: Natbib Commands
citealp*: Natbib Commands
citealt: Natbib Commands
Citealt: Natbib Commands
citealt*: Natbib Commands
citeasnoun: Harvard Commands
citeauthor: Apacite Commands
citeauthor: Natbib Commands
Citeauthor: Natbib Commands
citeauthor*: Natbib Commands
citename: AuthorDate Commands
citename: Harvard Commands
citeNP: Apacite Commands
citeonline: Uncategorized
citep: Natbib Commands
Citep: Natbib Commands
citep*: Natbib Commands
citet: Natbib Commands
Citet: Natbib Commands
citet*: Natbib Commands
citetext: Natbib Commands
citeyear: Apacite Commands
citeyear: Harvard Commands
citeyear: Natbib Commands
citeyear*: Harvard Commands
citeyearNP: Apacite Commands
citeyearpar: Natbib Commands
ck: German Commands
cleardoublepage: Uncategorized
clearpage: Uncategorized
cline: Preamble Commands
closing: Letter Commands
clubsuit: Uncategorized
comment: Environments
compactenum: Environments
compactitem: Environments
cong: Uncategorized
contentsline: Uncategorized
coprod: Uncategorized
cup: Uncategorized
CYRA: Russian Commands
cyra: Russian Commands
CYRB: Russian Commands
cyrb: Russian Commands
CYRC: Russian Commands
cyrc: Russian Commands
CYRCH: Russian Commands
cyrch: Russian Commands
CYRCHSH: Russian Commands
cyrchsh: Russian Commands
CYRD: Russian Commands
cyrd: Russian Commands
CYRE: Russian Commands
cyre: Russian Commands
CYREREV: Russian Commands
cyrerev: Russian Commands
CYRERY: Russian Commands
cyrery: Russian Commands
CYRF: Russian Commands
cyrf: Russian Commands
CYRG: Russian Commands
cyrg: Russian Commands
CYRH: Russian Commands
cyrh: Russian Commands
CYRHRDSN: Russian Commands
cyrhrdsn: Russian Commands
CYRI: Russian Commands
cyri: Russian Commands
CYRISHRT: Russian Commands
cyrishrt: Russian Commands
CYRK: Russian Commands
cyrk: Russian Commands
CYRL: Russian Commands
cyrl: Russian Commands
CYRM: Russian Commands
cyrm: Russian Commands
CYRN: Russian Commands
cyrn: Russian Commands
CYRO: Russian Commands
cyro: Russian Commands
CYRP: Russian Commands
cyrp: Russian Commands
CYRR: Russian Commands
cyrr: Russian Commands
CYRS: Russian Commands
cyrs: Russian Commands
CYRSFTSN: Russian Commands
cyrsftsn: Russian Commands
CYRSH: Russian Commands
cyrsh: Russian Commands
CYRT: Russian Commands
cyrt: Russian Commands
CYRU: Russian Commands
cyru: Russian Commands
CYRV: Russian Commands
cyrv: Russian Commands
CYRYA: Russian Commands
cyrya: Russian Commands
CYRYU: Russian Commands
cyryu: Russian Commands
CYRZ: Russian Commands
cyrz: Russian Commands
CYRZH: Russian Commands
cyrzh: Russian Commands

D
d: Special Characters
date: Uncategorized
ddot: Special Characters
ddots: Uncategorized
DeclareRobustCommand: Preamble Commands
DeclareRobustCommand*: Preamble Commands
def: Preamble Commands
degreecelsius: Preamble Commands
delta: Uncategorized
Delta: Uncategorized
description: Environments
deuxpoints: French Commands
dfrac: Uncategorized
Diamond: Uncategorized
diamondsuit: Uncategorized
displaymath: Environments
dittomark: French Commands
div: Uncategorized
document: Environments
documentclass: Preamble Commands
documentstyle: Preamble Commands
dot: Special Characters
doteq: Uncategorized
dotfill: Uncategorized
dots: Uncategorized
dots: Uncategorized
doublespacing: Preamble Commands
downarrow: Uncategorized
Downarrow: Uncategorized

E
efloatseparator: Uncategorized
ell: Uncategorized
em: Font Commands
em: Environments
emph: Font Commands
emptyset: Uncategorized
encl: Letter Commands
end: Basic Commands
endinput: Uncategorized
endnote: Basic Commands
endnotemark: Uncategorized
endnotetext: Preamble Commands
enotesize: Font Commands
ensuremath: Uncategorized
enumerate: Environments
epsfbox: Uncategorized
epsffile: Uncategorized
epsilon: Uncategorized
eqnarray: Environments
eqnarray*: Environments
eqref: Uncategorized
equation: Environments
equation*: Environments
equiv: Uncategorized
eta: Uncategorized
EUR: Preamble Commands
euro: Preamble Commands
evensidemargin: Preamble Commands
exists: Uncategorized

F
fancyfoot: Preamble Commands
fancyhead: Preamble Commands
fbox: Uncategorized
fbox: Uncategorized
FCS: French Commands
fg: French Commands
figure: Environments
figure*: Environments
flushbottom: Preamble Commands
flushleft: Environments
flushright: Environments
fnsymbol: Uncategorized
footnote: Basic Commands
footnotemark: Uncategorized
footnotesize: Font Commands
footnotetext: Preamble Commands
forall: Uncategorized
frac: Uncategorized
Frac: Uncategorized
framebox: Uncategorized
frenchspacing: Uncategorized
fullcite: Apacite Commands
fullciteA: Apacite Commands
fullciteauthor: Apacite Commands
fullciteNP: Apacite Commands
fup: French Commands

G
gamma: Uncategorized
Gamma: Uncategorized
ge: Uncategorized
geometry: Preamble Commands
geq: Uncategorized
gg: Uncategorized
glossary: Uncategorized
glossaryentry: Uncategorized
glq: German Commands
glqq: German Commands
grave: Special Characters
grq: German Commands
grqq: German Commands

H
H: Special Characters
harvardand: Harvard Commands
harvarditem: Harvard Commands
harvardyearleft: Harvard Commands
harvardyearright: Harvard Commands
hat: Special Characters
hbar: Uncategorized
hbox: Uncategorized
headheight: Preamble Commands
headsep: Preamble Commands
heartsuit: Uncategorized
hline: Preamble Commands
hoffset: Preamble Commands
hsize: Uncategorized
hslash: Uncategorized
hspace: Uncategorized
hspace*: Uncategorized
htmladdnormallink: Uncategorized
htmladdnormallink: Preamble Commands
htmlonly: Environments
htmlref: Uncategorized
htmlref: Preamble Commands
HUGE: Font Commands
Huge: Font Commands
huge: Font Commands
hyphenation: Preamble Commands

I
i: Special Characters
ieme: French Commands
iemes: French Commands
ier: French Commands
iere: French Commands
ieres: French Commands
iers: French Commands
iflatextortf: Preamble Commands
ifx: Preamble Commands
iiint: Uncategorized
iint: Uncategorized
Im: Uncategorized
in: Uncategorized
include: Uncategorized
include: Preamble Commands
includegraphics: Uncategorized
includegraphics*: Uncategorized
includeonly: Uncategorized
indent: Uncategorized
index: Uncategorized
indexentry: Uncategorized
inferieura: French Commands
infty: Uncategorized
input: Uncategorized
input: Preamble Commands
int: Uncategorized
int: Uncategorized
iota: Uncategorized
it: Font Commands
it: Environments
itemize: Environments
itshape: Font Commands
itshape: Environments

J
j: Special Characters

K
kappa: Uncategorized
kern: Logos

L
l: Special Characters
L: Special Characters
label: Uncategorized
lambda: Uncategorized
Lambda: Uncategorized
land: Uncategorized
landscape: Environments
langle: Uncategorized
LARGE: Font Commands
Large: Font Commands
large: Font Commands
LaTeX: Logos
latex: Logos
LaTeXe: Logos
latexonly: Environments
latextortffalse: Preamble Commands
latextortftrue: Preamble Commands
lceil: Uncategorized
LCS: French Commands
ldots: Uncategorized
le: Uncategorized
left: Uncategorized
leftarrow: Uncategorized
Leftarrow: Uncategorized
leftharpoondown: Uncategorized
leftleftarrows: Uncategorized
leftrightarrow: Uncategorized
Leftrightarrow: Uncategorized
leftrightarrows: Uncategorized
leq: Uncategorized
let: Uncategorized
letter: Environments
letterspace: Uncategorized
lfloor: Uncategorized
lfoot: Preamble Commands
lhead: Preamble Commands
lim: Uncategorized
liminf: Uncategorized
limsup: Uncategorized
linebreak: Uncategorized
lineskip: Uncategorized
link: HyperLatex Commands
list: Environments
listoffigures: Uncategorized
listoffiles: Preamble Commands
listoftables: Uncategorized
ll: Uncategorized
longleftarrow: Uncategorized
longleftrightarrows: Uncategorized
longrightarrow: Uncategorized
longtable: Environments
longtable*: Environments
lor: Uncategorized
lower: Logos
lq: French Commands
lqq: French Commands
LyX: Logos

M
makebox: Uncategorized
makeglossary: Preamble Commands
makeindex: Preamble Commands
makelabels: Preamble Commands
maketitle: Uncategorized
mapsto: Uncategorized
marginpar: Uncategorized
markboth: Uncategorized
markboth: Preamble Commands
markright: Uncategorized
markright: Preamble Commands
math: Environments
mathbf: Font Commands
mathcal: Font Commands
mathit: Font Commands
mathmd: Font Commands
mathnormal: Font Commands
mathrm: Font Commands
mathsc: Font Commands
mathsf: Font Commands
mathsl: Font Commands
mathtt: Font Commands
mathup: Font Commands
matrix: Uncategorized
mbox: Uncategorized
mdseries: Font Commands
mdseries: Environments
measuredangle: Uncategorized
medskip: Uncategorized
mho: Uncategorized
minipage: Environments
mit: Font Commands
moveleft: Uncategorized
moveright: Uncategorized
mp: Uncategorized
mu: Uncategorized
multicolumn: Uncategorized
multicolumn: Environments
music: Environments

N
nabla: Uncategorized
ne: Uncategorized
nearrow: Uncategorized
neg: Uncategorized
neq: Uncategorized
newblock: Uncategorized
newcommand: Preamble Commands
newcount: Uncategorized
newcounter: Preamble Commands
newenvironment: Preamble Commands
newfont: Uncategorized
newif: Preamble Commands
newlength: Preamble Commands
newpage: Uncategorized
newsavebox: Uncategorized
newtheorem: Preamble Commands
nobibliography: Uncategorized
nobreakspace: Uncategorized
nobreakspace: Preamble Commands
nocite: Uncategorized
nofiles: Preamble Commands
noindent: Uncategorized
nolinebreak: Uncategorized
nonfrenchspacing: Uncategorized
nonumber: Uncategorized
nopagebreak: Uncategorized
normalfont: Font Commands
normalsize: Font Commands
notag: Uncategorized
nu: Uncategorized
numberline: Uncategorized
numero: French Commands
Numero: French Commands
numeros: French Commands
Numeros: French Commands
nwarrow: Uncategorized

O
oddsidemargin: Preamble Commands
og: French Commands
omega: Uncategorized
Omega: Uncategorized
omicron: Uncategorized
onecolumn: Uncategorized
onlinecite: Uncategorized
opening: Letter Commands
oplus: Uncategorized
oslash: Uncategorized
otimes: Uncategorized
output: Uncategorized
overline: Uncategorized

P
pagebreak: Uncategorized
pagenumbering: Uncategorized
pagenumbering: Preamble Commands
pageref: Uncategorized
Pageref: HyperLatex Commands
pagestyle: Uncategorized
pagestyle: Preamble Commands
par: Uncategorized
paragraph: Sectioning Commands
paragraph*: Sectioning Commands
parbox: Uncategorized
parindent: Preamble Commands
parskip: Preamble Commands
part: Sectioning Commands
part*: Sectioning Commands
partial: Uncategorized
perp: Uncategorized
phi: Uncategorized
Phi: Uncategorized
pi: Uncategorized
Pi: Uncategorized
picture: Environments
pm: Uncategorized
pointexclamation: French Commands
pointinterrogation: French Commands
pointvirgule: French Commands
possessivecite: Harvard Commands
prec: Uncategorized
primo: French Commands
printindex: Uncategorized
prod: Uncategorized
prod: Uncategorized
propto: Uncategorized
protect: Uncategorized
providecommand: Preamble Commands
ps: Letter Commands
psfig: Uncategorized
psfrag: Uncategorized
psi: Uncategorized
Psi: Uncategorized

Q
qquad: Uncategorized
quad: Uncategorized
quarto: French Commands
quotation: Environments
quote: Environments

R
r: Special Characters
raggedbottom: Preamble Commands
raggedright: Basic Commands
raisebox: Uncategorized
rangle: Uncategorized
rawhtml: Environments
rceil: Uncategorized
Re: Uncategorized
ref: Uncategorized
Ref: HyperLatex Commands
refstepcounter: Uncategorized
renewcommand: Preamble Commands
renewenvironment: Preamble Commands
renewtheorem: Preamble Commands
resizebox: Preamble Commands
resizebox*: Preamble Commands
rfloor: Uncategorized
rfoot: Preamble Commands
rhead: Preamble Commands
rho: Uncategorized
right: Uncategorized
Rightarrow: Uncategorized
rightarrow: Uncategorized
rightharpoonup: Uncategorized
rightleftarrows: Uncategorized
rightleftharpoons: Uncategorized
rightrightarrows: Uncategorized
rm: Font Commands
rm: Environments
rmfamily: Font Commands
rmfamily: Environments
Roman: Uncategorized
roman: Uncategorized
rq: French Commands
rqq: French Commands
rule: Uncategorized

S
S: HyperLatex Commands
samepage: Uncategorized
savebox: Uncategorized
sbox: Uncategorized
sc: Font Commands
sc: Environments
scfamily: Font Commands
scriptsize: Font Commands
scshape: Font Commands
scshape: Environments
searrow: Uncategorized
section: Sectioning Commands
section*: Sectioning Commands
secundo: French Commands
setbox: Uncategorized
setcounter: Preamble Commands
setlength: Preamble Commands
settowidth: Uncategorized
sf: Font Commands
sf: Environments
sffamily: Font Commands
sffamily: Environments
shortcite: Apacite Commands
shortcite: AuthorDate Commands
shortciteA: Apacite Commands
shortciteauthor: Apacite Commands
shortciteNP: Apacite Commands
sigma: Uncategorized
Sigma: Uncategorized
signature: Preamble Commands
signature: Letter Commands
sim: Uncategorized
simeq: Uncategorized
sl: Font Commands
sl: Environments
SLiTeX: Logos
sloppypar: Environments
slshape: Font Commands
slshape: Environments
small: Font Commands
small: Environments
smallskip: Uncategorized
spadesuit: Uncategorized
sqrt: Uncategorized
ssmall: Font Commands
stackrel: Uncategorized
stepcounter: Uncategorized
stretch: Uncategorized
subparagraph: Sectioning Commands
subparagraph*: Sectioning Commands
subsection: Sectioning Commands
subsection*: Sectioning Commands
subset: Uncategorized
subseteq: Uncategorized
subsubsection: Sectioning Commands
subsubsection*: Sectioning Commands
succ: Uncategorized
sum: Uncategorized
sum: Uncategorized
superieura: French Commands
supset: Uncategorized
supseteq: Uncategorized
surd: Uncategorized
swarrow: Uncategorized

T
tabbing: Environments
table: Environments
table*: Environments
tableofcontents: Uncategorized
tabular: Environments
tabular*: Environments
tau: Uncategorized
tertio: French Commands
TeX: Logos
textalpha: Uncategorized
textbeta: Uncategorized
textbf: Font Commands
textbullet: Uncategorized
textchi: Uncategorized
textcolor: Uncategorized
textDelta: Uncategorized
textdelta: Uncategorized
textellipsis: Uncategorized
textepsilon: Uncategorized
texteta: Uncategorized
textfont: Font Commands
textGamma: Uncategorized
textgamma: Uncategorized
textheight: Preamble Commands
textiota: Uncategorized
textit: Font Commands
textkappa: Uncategorized
textLambda: Uncategorized
textlambda: Uncategorized
textmd: Font Commands
textmu: Uncategorized
textnormal: Font Commands
textnu: Uncategorized
textOmega: Uncategorized
textomega: Uncategorized
textperiodcentered: Uncategorized
textPhi: Uncategorized
textphi: Uncategorized
textPi: Uncategorized
textpi: Uncategorized
textPsi: Uncategorized
textpsi: Uncategorized
textrm: Font Commands
textsc: Font Commands
textsf: Font Commands
textSigma: Uncategorized
textsigma: Uncategorized
textsl: Font Commands
textsubscript: Uncategorized
textsuperscript: Uncategorized
textTau: Uncategorized
texttau: Uncategorized
textTheta: Uncategorized
texttheta: Uncategorized
texttt: Font Commands
textup: Font Commands
textwidth: Preamble Commands
textXi: Uncategorized
textxi: Uncategorized
textzeta: Uncategorized
thanks: Uncategorized
the: Basic Commands
thebibliography: Environments
theendnotes: Preamble Commands
theindex: Environments
thepage: Preamble Commands
therefore: Uncategorized
Theta: Uncategorized
theta: Uncategorized
thispagestyle: Preamble Commands
tikzpicture: Uncategorized
tilde: Special Characters
times: Uncategorized
tiny: Font Commands
title: Uncategorized
titlepage: Environments
to: Uncategorized
today: Basic Commands
topmargin: Preamble Commands
triangleleft: Uncategorized
triangleright: Uncategorized
tt: Font Commands
tt: Environments
ttfamily: Font Commands
ttfamily: Environments
twocolumn: Uncategorized
typeaout: Uncategorized
Typein: Uncategorized
typein: Uncategorized
typeout: Uncategorized

U
u: Special Characters
underbar: Font Commands
underline: Font Commands
up: French Commands
Uparrow: Uncategorized
uparrow: Uncategorized
updownarrow: Uncategorized
Updownarrow: Uncategorized
upshape: Font Commands
upsilon: Uncategorized
Upsilon: Uncategorized
url: Uncategorized
usebox: Uncategorized
usepackage: Preamble Commands
usepackage [options] {acronym}: Acronym Commands
uv: Czech Commands

V
v: Special Characters
value: Uncategorized
varepsilon: Uncategorized
varnothing: Uncategorized
varphi: Uncategorized
varpi: Uncategorized
varpropto: Uncategorized
varsigma: Uncategorized
vartheta: Uncategorized
vbox: Uncategorized
vcenter: Basic Commands
vdots: Uncategorized
vec: Special Characters
vee: Uncategorized
verb: Uncategorized
verb*: Uncategorized
verbatim: Environments
Verbatim: Environments
verbositylevel: Preamble Commands
verse: Environments
voffset: Preamble Commands
vref: Uncategorized
vsize: Uncategorized
vskip: Uncategorized
vspace: Uncategorized
vspace*: Uncategorized

W
wedge: Uncategorized
wp: Uncategorized

X
xi: Uncategorized
Xi: Uncategorized
xlink: HyperLatex Commands

Z
zeta: Uncategorized

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10 Concept Index

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Index Entry  Section

%
%latex2rtf: Conditional Parsing

A
APA Support: APA Support
apacite: Cross References
apalike: Cross References
apanat1b: Cross References
authordate: Cross References

B
babel: Language Support
bibliography: Cross References
bibliography, apacite: Cross References
bibliography, apalike: Cross References
bibliography, apanat1b: Cross References
bibliography, authordate: Cross References
bibliography, BibTeX: Cross References
bibliography, harvard: Cross References
bibliography, natbib: Cross References
BibTeX: Cross References

C
Conditional Parsing: Conditional Parsing
Copyright issues: History

D
direct.cfg: Input Processing
double spacing: Page Formatting

E
equations: Equations

F
footnotes: Cross References

G
geometry package: Page Formatting
graphics: Graphics

H
harvard: Cross References
History of the program: History
hyperlatex: Hyperlatex

I
iflatextortf: Conditional Parsing
ignore.cfg: Input Processing
index: Cross References
input processing: Input Processing
installation: Installation

L
language support: Language Support
line spacing: Page Formatting

M
margins: Page Formatting
math: Math and Special Symbols

N
natbib: Cross References

P
page formatting: Page Formatting
pagestyles: Pagestyles

R
RTF sucks: Introduction

S
setspace package: Page Formatting
special symbols: Math and Special Symbols

T
tables: Tables

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Table of Contents